RMOUG follow up

February 18th, 2013

P1020033

Mogens presenting in a bathrobe before 800 people

Lots of good presentations, discussions and interactions with people at RMOUG. Kudos goes out to all the RMOUG team for putting on an awesome conference. Thanks to Tim Gorman, Kellyn Pot’vin  and all the dedicated volunteers.

My favorite presentation  was by Jordan Meyer of Rittman Mead consulting. He did social media analysis with R.  His R source code is available at

https://github.com/jordanmeyer/oracle-sna-hol

Slides are available at http://www.rittmanmead.com/articles/, specifically

RMOUG2013  20 20 SNA with Oracle.pdf

He took as an example the speakers from RMOUG and looked at their relationships on Twitter. Using this data he illustrated different network relationships such as

  • nodes an edges
  • directed and undirected
  • diameter and shortest path
  • Clustering Coefficient (Density)
  • Degree Centrality
  • Closeness Centrality
  • Betweeness Centrality
  • Largest Click
  • Largest K-Core

Here are the speakers and their connections on Twitter

 

 

rmoug_network

Here are the speakers and their “Betweeness Centrality”

rmoug_network_degrees_of_centrality

Here are the speakers that are the core of the community

 

rmoug_network_click

Here are the speakers that are the more relaxed core of the community

rmoug_network_K_core

I also enjoyed Martin Widlake’s presentation on “The First Five Things to Know About Exadata“, Karl Arao’s talk on “A Consolidation Success Story” and Fritz Hoogland’s presentation on “About Multiblock Read“.

Fritz showed some cool ways of tracing processes and show the surprising fact that Oracle doesn’t always record every wait event in some cases when a wait event is fast enough. This applies to direct path reads in particular.

Martin’s presentation was a great overview of Exadata from the persepective of someone who knows Oracle well but has never worked on an Exadata.

Between Martin’s talk and discussions with many people there on Exadata it seems clear to me that Exadata is great for data warehouse but can actually be a negative impact for OLTP.  OLTP apparently is better, not to mention cheaper,  on ODA.

 

I spent much of my time at the Delphix booth which was great fun. People seemed to get the value of Delphix immediately in one sentence: “Provision database clones in 2 minutes with almost no storage overhead by sharing duplicate blocks across all database copies “. We gave two talks on database virtualization and both generated a flood of people visiting our booth.  We scanned almost 200 people at the booth or about 25% of the conference.

 

 

 

 


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